Lambs and Dragons

meanee new zealand lambs

Ohhhh yeah…it’s Spring finally. Daffodils and lambs, what’s not to love!? The place we lived when we arrived on the North Island had a herd of sheep and almost all of them had lambs on the way. It seemed to take forever, but after we moved from there, the lambs finally came into the world and I made sure to go cuddle some.

meanee new zealand lambs
Following their mom!

Sandra had to hand rear a few of them and asked if I wanted to give them a small early feed. Of course I jumped on that and she warned me that they would probably mob me and that made me even more excited! Mobbed by lambs…who wouldn’t want that?

They were busy in the corner of the paddock and when Sandra hollered for them, three bottles in hand, they came running! My voice raised a few octaves as I greeted them and fed two of them while Sandra took a video of it. She held a bottle between her knees for one of the lambs…a pretty funny sight. After a couple of minutes, the milk was gone and they were looking for more. They followed Sandra around the yard for a while and then finally went off to do whatever lambs do all day!

I went for a drive closer to home a week or so later to see some other lambs and found a lot of twins playing together during one of the warmer days of the season.

waipukurau new zealand lambs

waipukurau lambs

waipukurau new zealand lambs

This wee one had gotten separated from its mom and tried to get a feed off of a different one. It was pushed away and both looked on as the baby bleated for its family.

We took a drive to Blackhead beach and saw some llamas (actually probably alpacas) along the way. I figured babies would be super adorable, but only saw what appeared to be adolescent ones.

new zealand llamas
That one looks a bit old to be feeding (and where’s the head exactly?)!

new zealand llamas

The beach was pretty and I was able to catch some rays before some clouds came and made it too chilly to stay.

blackhead beach new zealand

Blackhead beach new zealand

baby mussels

baby mussels new zealand

I noticed these baby mussels stuck to a rock. I can’t imagine these are the same kind as the really large ones I’d find on the beaches like the green lipped mussels.

If you’ve grown tired of hearing about lambs, you’d better stop reading here. My friend has a small lifestyle block and one of her sheep had twins, so I went over as soon as humanly possible to see the babies.

waipukurau new zealand lambs

These precious girls were only a few days old and were very patient with me. One had been pretty weak after she was born and Liz took care of her for a day or two, but was glad to see she was doing better. I’ll go back in a week to check in on them and see if we can catch them for a couple more hugs.

My aunt dug up a photo of my grandmother holding some lambs too, so here we are side by side.

megrandmalambs

waipukurau new zealand lambs
Wee girl going back to fat mama after being accosted by me

waipukurau new zealand lamb

I’m betting the adults even think they’re adorable. I often see sheep staring at the babies…I wonder what goes through their minds?

Liz found out I was a reptile nut and told me she had some friends with a bearded dragon. Of course I wanted to see him so we went over to meet Boz and his humans.

bearded dragon new zealand
Boz the dragon

He was a beauty, sporting a lovely orange colour and calm as could be. Christine showed us how she raises some of his food. I had no idea that meal worms were anything other than just worms! She showed us the top drawer of the container which had black beetles in it, then the second that had the meal worms and the third which had the larvae. Boz looked on without diving in, remaining cool and collected.

mealworms new zealand

mealworms new zealand

mealworms new zealand

Boz also eats greens and is super healthy and happy since he also has a playpen outside! Complete with some stacked rocks warmed by the sun and a concrete turtle, he can soak up vitamin D and get some fresh air.

bearded dragon new zealand

bearded dragon new zealand

bearded dragon new zealand

It’s pretty rare to see lizards here and now you must have a license to own one. I also didn’t realize that bearded dragons hail from Oz! I offered up my pet sitting services if they ever needed someone, so I hope to meet up with them again soon.

Finally, a some closing shots of a Tui which visited the patio briefly and the ranges. Still loving the views here and my veggie seeds are sprouting, with some strawberries, garlic, celery and rhubarb already in the garden. I think it’s going to be a good season!

waipukurau new zealand tui bird

waipukurau tb hospital Ruahine Range

 

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Exploring Hawke’s Bay

cornwall park hastings

It’s nice being in a new place and a bit farther from the South Pole. It feels warmer than it did in Blenheim, even though we’re heading into the worst of winter. A few days after my 47th birthday, we happened upon Cornwall Park in Hastings with more of my favourite old, creepy trees. This one though, had something I hadn’t seen before…an unmanned atrium loaded with orchids, lilies, hibiscus and other tropical plants. There were cameras in operation, though.

cornwall park hastings

cornwall park hastings

cornwall park hastings

cornwall park hastings

cornwall park hastings

It also had an Asian flair to it.

cornwall park hastings

cornwall park hastings

I always have to get a shot of those trees!

cornwall park hastings

cornwall park hastings

cornwall park hastings

We took another drive out to Cape Kidnappers and walked farther this time, along the beach. I love looking for things along the beach and since most coastlines are deserted, you can often see some interesting stuff.
cape kidnappers

cape kidnappers

I had always thought the term ‘hairy muscle’ was just some kind of weird Kiwi humour. Nope…it’s for real! This was one of many that were scattered along the beach. A green lipped mussel with…well…hair…kind of.

cape kidnappers

This sign is meant to catch your eye…at first all I read was ‘dead children’. There’s that Kiwi humour!

The cliffs were stunning and I wished I could remember back to my geology class what these different striations meant.

cape kidnappers
Waterfall carved into the hill
cape kidnappers
Looks like a violent move here

cape kidnappers

At the bottom of this cliff was a dead sheep. It’s not unusual to see, actually. We pondered if another one of her sheep ‘buddies’ pushed her over. This was about the time we turned back.

cape kidnappers
Sheep not getting too close to the edge

cape kidnappers

There’s a gannet colony at the end of that point. The only way to get there is to walk the beach (and check the tide chart!) or by tractor tours.

This was one interesting thing I saw, thinking it might have been ambergris which could have been a great find. With all of the whales in New Zealand, it wasn’t out of the realm of possibility. I did not take it home though for some reason. When I researched it, this was probably a sponge, as can be seen by the small holes next to that rock. It didn’t look like a normal ‘sponge’ I’m used to seeing but it may have been fresh. Of course, I’ll never really know.

cape kidnappers

Walking back to the car was this lovely old character home with a small windbreak to protect it from the constant breeze off the ocean.

cape kidnappers

A gum tree caught my eye as well. I love how the bark is different colours and as others have mentioned, looks like a tattoo.

cape kidnappers gum tree

cape kidnappers gum tree

A week later, we headed to the Hasting’s farmer’s market where I grabbed a huge bag of habanero’s for $6 and some lemons. This bunch of silver beets caught my eye with their gorgeous rainbow colours. At first I thought it was rhubarb.

hastings farmer's market

I also found a persimmon tree down the street from where we were staying!

persimmon tree new zealand

You know I’m a sucker for fog and I took advantage of the photo ops one morning around the farm.

A pukeko looked for breakfast and squawked to his buddies while the teenage cows minded their own business.

pukeko in the mist

Fast forward slightly to my now current home of Waipukurau (Waipuk for short). We drove up to a lookout and I was finally able to get a photo of the Oreo cow (Belted Galloway) next to a spotted pig. I see a lot of these cows around New Zealand. I’m waiting to find one with multiple black and white stripes one day!

We went to a sandy beach about 25 minutes from here which was deserted. But on the way there were some interesting sights and fantastic scenery. There are things in New Zealand I’ve never seen elsewhere, like these pink ponds which are actually algae.

pink algae pond new zealand

pink algae pond new zealand

pink algae pond new zealand

pink algae pond new zealand

Then we were stopped by a mob of sheep hogging up the entire road (not to mention on a 100km/h stretch of it!). Andy was patiently driving behind them as I urged him to just push on past and they’d get out of the way. We knew the farmer was around the bend waiting for them. A local drove up behind us and waited for a bit, before doing what I had suggested. Moving far over to the left and driving slowly, the sheep scattered out of the way and we could then pass.

A few minutes later, for a fleeting moment I saw giraffes on the top of a hill! Obviously fake, but pretty realistic from a distance, I told him he had to try and stop somewhere on the way back for a picture.

metal giraffes new zealand

Once we made it to Pourerere Beach, the sun came out and a rainbow appeared briefly. We walked along the beach and I found a lot of cool shells.

pourerere beach

A lot of kelp (seaweed?) littered the beach. The waves were pretty rough and the feet of the kelp looked like they had been ripped out quite forcibly.

pourerere beach

pourerere beachpourerere beachpourerere beach

We’ll be seeing more of the upper North Island in December for a mini-road trip. It’ll be great getting out to the sandy beaches in the summer and may finally change my mind about the weather in New Zealand. At least I hope it will!pourerere beach

 

 

A Little Taste of Home

We had the opportunity to take a short trip over to Hastings and finally experience some American BBQ along with a chili and chili dog eating contest. Bareknuckle BBQ was serving up some food as well which I’ve been looking forward to trying. We grabbed a fried chicken burger, a pulled pork sandwich, some waffle fries and a couple of Corona’s. $53 later, lunch was served!

Unfortunately, the pork missed the mark with me. Had it not been for the flavour of anise in it for some odd reason, it would’ve been great. Hefty American servings left me far too full and unable to finish everything.

As we waited for it to be served, a chili eating contest was going on. First the jalapenos (which I missed) and then on to the habaneros. Wow…I can’t believe anyone, much less the sole woman, would even participate in that. I’m sure they’re feelin’ the burn tonight!

Unfortunately, I can’t tell you who won the contest, but here were the baskets of prizes!

Samples from the chili contest were being handed out, nice and cold…New Zealand style. Something about cold chili that doesn’t quite feel like home. First rule: chili should not be chilly.

bare knuckle bbq chilli contest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of them weren’t that bad though. We didn’t stay long enough to find out who won.

Then began the chili dog eating contest. Ughhhhh…I’m still full after watching it. The dogs were way larger than American hot dogs, no doubt about it. They set about 5 in front of them, giving them 3 minutes to see who would eat the most. Let the pictures speak for themselves.

Getting ready
That’s a lotta dog
May the best man win
This poor kid was having issues with the first one

I’m feelin their pain at this point

IMG_1905

This was about the time the MC extended the contest by one minute
Still plenty to eat!
My man Matthew keeping control of the situation
After another couple of one minute extensions, time was coming to a close. The crowd was very sympathetic.

Comparing what’s left on the trays
The winner is announced!

Apparently, they were overly optimistic about how many dogs would be eaten. A few more trays were brought out and the vultures swooped in!

This was the first American event I’ve been to here and it was fun hearing so many familiar accents again. We had a good time and will be back for the next one!

bare knuckle bbq

 

 

 

 

Lower North Island: Napier & Taupo

maori rock carvings taupo mine bay

We took a trip to the lower North Island, which I wasn’t familiar with at all. Starting in Wellington, we worked our way up through Masterton to Hastings/Napier (the Art Deco capital of the world, allegedly) then to Taupo and back down toward Palmerston North.

Cape kidnappers sign beach

 

Having read about the promise of wide, warm, golden sand beaches and Cape Kidnappers, which just sounds cool, I knew it would be a stop on the way to Napier. Because of my directional challenges and inability to read a map, we missed the warm sandy beach but did get as far down the road as we could to view Cape Kidnappers. Aptly named by Captain Cook after an attempt by a local Maori to abduct a crew member of his in 1769. The only way to get out to that stretch of land is by a tour or a very long walk. It’s a gannet breeding area and would have been nice to see but that beach was calling my name. Turns out I was WAY off course in finding it, as we found out later.

napier main road pine trees
Road leading into Napier

Napier from the beach

Napier is a quaint seaside town located on Hawke’s Bay. Unfortunately it was a rock beach (I can’t seem to escape those) but the shopping made up for it and it was sunny and warm. This town had been leveled by an earthquake in 1931 and over 250 people were killed. Art deco was the popular style at the time and the town was rebuilt in that fashion.

Napier art deco building

There were a bunch of seaside wall art paintings which I just love!

Napier whale seawall art

Napier shark seawall art

Napier whale seawall art

Napier wall art jellyfish

Napier wall art jellyfish

Near the port there was a small tower with more paintings on it as well.

Napier lookout tower

Napier lookout tower

Napier lookout tower

The walk along the port had these gorgeous purple flowers and of course the ginormous bumble bees were there as well.

Napier port

napier purple flowers bee

New Zealand has the best flowers and gardens…this one in the Centennial Gardens had a waterfall.

Napier botanical gardens waterfall

A pier had a cool covering over it which drew people in (although there was really nothing to see at the end of it).

Napier pier

Napier pier

Destined to find that spot called Ocean Beach, we headed out on a nice sunny day and finally came across it! This was the view at the top of the road looking onto it.

Hastings Ocean Beach

Fairly deserted, we staked out a spot in the sand and relaxed.

Hastings Ocean Beach

Round about 3:30 it started to cool down and people began leaving. We weren’t far behind.

Hastings Ocean Beach Road
Road leading down to Ocean Beach

 

craggy rock vineyard cows

We drove past Craggy Range winery which had these huge cattle statues in their front lawn. Unfortunately, they were closed so we weren’t able to do a tasting.

welcome to taupo sign

On to Taupo via the Thermal Explorer Highway. Taupo lake is in a caldera (volcanic crater) which is as big as Singapore! There’s still a slight possibility that it may erupt again someday. I booked a room for two nights which included a private tub in the back yard that can be filled with hot thermal water. Hopefully the volcano will keep a lid on it until I’m done.

taupo mount tauhara

Mount Tauhara was the first thing we saw before cresting over the hill and getting a view of the lake. On the horizon you could see three volcanoes: Tongariro, Ngauruhoe, and Ruapehu. People from around the world come to do the Tongariro crossing, a 19.4km journey through this dual World Heritage site. It ranks in the top 10 single day treks in the world.

taupo 3 volcanoes

We went on a sailing trip in fairly choppy waters and it was the only day the three volcanoes were visible during our time there. We grabbed some shelter in Acacia Bay where there was no wind at all. The hills were dotted with very unique and individually designed homes. Most of these are only used a few weeks out of the year as vacation homes. Must be nice.

taupo acacia bay homes

taupo acacia bay homes

taupo acacia bay homes

These Maori rock carvings were done in the 70’s.

maori rock carvings taupo mine bay

maori rock carvings taupo mine bay

maori rock carvings taupo mine bay

maori rock carvings taupo mine bay

maori rock carvings taupo mine bay

Later that evening we parked along the lake and watched the sunset.

taupo sunset

We checked out some thermal terraces that had hot springs and took a walk through an area called Craters of the Moon. A barren, steamy area that, in black and white, certainly would remind you of the Moon! I was actually reminded of Woody Allen’s “Smoke and Fog.”

taupo thermal terraces

taupo thermal terraces

taupo thermal terraces

taupo thermal terraces

Craters of the moon taupo

taupo thermal terraces

Craters of the moon taupo

Some ducks provided a nice photo op as well.

Craters of the moon taupo

Craters of the moon taupo

Along that same stretch of road was a sign for another thermal walkway so we popped in, not thinking we’d see all of these cool animals!

Peacocks strutted their stuff, trying to impress the females. Rabbits hung out in cages, chickens with their chicks ran around looking for food and alpacas seemed annoyed, ready to spit in my face.

thermal walkway taupo peacocks

thermal walkway taupo peacocks

thermal walkway taupo peacocks

thermal walkway taupo peacocks

thermal walkway taupo peacocks

thermal walkway taupo alpaca

We stopped into a shop called the Bee Hive and I picked up some honey. Found some of that Manuka honey I’ve been on about. Anybody up for some? It costs about as much as a hotel room!

manuka honey

As we traveled toward Palmerston North, we drove on the Desert Road through the Rangipo Desert. Weird, right? No cactus here! Just tussocks and sand. It sort of reminded me of being back down south on the farm. It resembles a desert due to the low amount of rain as well as the sterilization of seeds from volcanic eruptions about 20,000 years ago. You’d think something would have sprouted up by now, but the soil quality is bad so only tussocks and snow grasses remain.

desert road new zealand north island

desert road new zealand north island

desert road new zealand north island

It was nice to be able to see more of the country and I finally feel like I have a great overview of New Zealand’s terrain. I won’t forget how fortunate I’ve been to live here but am still in complete denial that I’m so close to the South Pole. I don’t think I’ll ever get used to the weather!

Typical NZ...what you see in front of you isn't what always what's in back!
Typical NZ…what you see in front of you isn’t always what’s in back!