Strange Cucumber Fruits

horned melon new zealand

I’ve seen these things in the store recently but with a price tag of $5, I wasn’t about to try it out. However, yesterday my boyfriend wanted to go buy some ‘treats’ and happily threw it in the basket. I had no idea what to expect. I figured with those spines on it, whatever was inside HAD to be delicious. It sort of reminded me of the dragon fruit I had in Oz that I liked a lot. It also reminded me of a microscopic germ on steroids.

microgerms

This fruit goes by many names. The label said ‘Kiwano’ and claimed it was from here. Seemed to me it was probably not a native and a quick search confirmed it was originally from Africa. Also called a horned melon, jelly melon, African horned cucumber and hedged gourd…native to the Kalahari desert. It apparently contains a lot of water, which comes in handy when you’re in the desert! It grows as a vine and is a member of the cucumber and melon family.

What I saw inside was not what I had expected:

seeds in horn melon

I can see the resemblance to a cucumber as far as the seeds go and it certainly was juicy! I tried to dig a spoon in it to get it out but that wasn’t happening…it was too tough. So I took a knife around the edges and it still didn’t want to release until I cut all the way around it.

inside horned melon

horned cucumber seeds

I scooped around the edges with a spoon so I could get a taste of this and was not pleasantly surprised. It wasn’t sweet at all and as you can see, was very gelatinous. The seeds were tough…more so than a cucumber and the flavour was reminiscent of one. After reading that it was quite nutritious, I felt like I should at least slurp some down. My boyfriend was NOT having anything to do with it. Visually appetizing, it was not. It reminded me of something from a Ridley Scott movie.

jelly melon seeds

So I drank/ate a few spoonfuls because I hate throwing away $5, even if it wasn’t mine. I put the rest in a container and will figure out what to do with it. The guilt is taking over if you couldn’t tell. I would’ve felt better about buying the $8 raspberries…at least I would’ve enjoyed them!

A day or two before, I was in an op shop which often sells local fruit that people bring in as a donation when they have too much of it. As I was paying for my item, I noticed a basket that had some odd looking things I had never seen before so I asked what they were. She said they were apple cucumbers.

apple cucumber new zealand nz

“Do they taste good?” I asked.
“Yes, they’re sweet. I’ve seen people start eating them as they’re walking out of the shop.”
“So you don’t have to peel them or anything?”
“Nope…just eat them as is.”

Well, the skin didn’t look too appealing to me so needless to say, I took it home and let it sit until today. I figured maybe this would make up for the kiwano. So, I cut into it, as my stomach rumbled.

inside apple cucumber nz

The first thing that hit me was the smell of cucumber and look at those seeds! Vaguely familiar, I’d say. Ok, so this should be sweet then. I went ahead and bit some of the skin off along with a chunk of the seeds and jelly inner. Not sweet. After a few chews, I got that drying, bitter banana skin taste and I made a face. I dug into the center and had another go. Bleh. Well, for 50 cents, I suppose it was worth a try.

Now to find something substantial for lunch!

 

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Ducks, Eels & a Parade

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We took a ride outside of our bubble to Norsewood one weekend. I was told they had some sort of wool outlet store with good sales, so that was enough of a reason for me! The shop was ok, certainly no bargains to be had…where I really scored was around the corner! If I’ve learned anything, it’s when there’s an eel on a sign, that means they’re close by! It sounded like it was a paid entry to a park, but as we approached, it was free to walk around.

IMG_3456Nicely landscaped and a small stream running through it, Andy spotted eels right away…..BIG ONES! They all huddled in a deep area before a small waterfall, somehow managing not to get swept over it.

The longest one was at least 4 1/2 feet and they appeared to be wanting food. A sign said ‘no unauthorized feeding’ and besides, I didn’t have anything with me to be tempted.

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We walked around Norsewood for a bit, finding the old jail the most interesting thing there.

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The jail cells were like large, dark saunas. I’m not sure which would have been worse…being in the cell or sitting in that chair all day!

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Captivating reading

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We headed back through Waipuk to Waipawa for the duck races! Yep, this is what I get excited about now. Let me tell ya, it was hoppin’ in that little town! Lots of stalls and I even picked up more duck eggs. If you ever have the chance to buy these, do it. I had them once in Texas and they were great! Cook up nice and fluffy and they have more protein than chicken eggs. There are quite a few duck egg “dealers” around here so I’m happy about that. I paid $3.50 for half a dozen.

duck eggs
Duck egg on the left, chicken egg on the right

We headed down to the river to watch the duck race. People were able to buy a ticket for their duck but unfortunately, I couldn’t tell you what the prize was. Proceeds went to the Ronald McDonald House which was about $1200.

A tractor had dug out the area for the ducks and a man stood behind the finishing line, waiting for them to arrive.

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Two ducks were head and tails above the rest and once the others arrived, the mad rush to net and stuff them in bags was on!

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Last weekend was the Waipukurau parade, celebrating 150 years on the map. I’d never seen so many people here! It consisted of vintage fire trucks, cars and dress. Even a tiny (fat) pony!

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Over the same long weekend, we visited a winery nearby which is on a property that was originally a retreat for WWI soldiers, then became a sanitorium and then in the 50’s, a care facility. It was abandoned in 1998. Pukeora estate is now up for sale after being occupied by a couple for the past 17 years if anyone’s interested!

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We were able to walk through one of the buildings which was a bit creepy. A bird was trapped in one of the rooms so I opened the windows and door and he eventually flew out…PHEW!

The wine was very good and we left with a couple of bottles. Another couple who lives on site has an art gallery which was terrific. The vineyard is perched on limestone and we saw some small fossils in the hills leading up to the place. Kinda reminded me of home.

Finally, we went back to a memorial park for a longer walk to see what was blooming.

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This interesting park is full of plaques memorializing family members. They planted flowers, trees and bushes around each one. Each area is different and there’s a small stream running through the park as well.

IMG_3658Some of these folks were close to or over 100. Although some were younger than us, which made us feel lucky to be alive.

I found out that these hard, bumpy fruits were from the strawberry tree! You can eat them when they turn red and I haven’t figured out if they’re delicious or otherwise, as I picked a couple that were yellow. I’m giving it another couple of days before opening them up.

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Thanksgiving is around the corner and it’s going to be a little different this year! You won’t believe the story.

Tonight, the clouds were in rare form and I’m waiting for something to happen!

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A Winter Walk Through the Park

Pakowhai Regional Park ginkgo tree
Pakowhai Regional Park ginkgo tree

Four days after winter arrived, we finally went for a walk in a park near Hastings. We’d passed by it many times before, but the yellow ginkgo trees caught my eye and I had my camera with me. I declared we would be going there on our way back home (without any rebuttal from the driver). Pakowhai Regional Park

Pakowhai (pronounced POK-o-fie) Regional Park was clearly a dog park. People there (of which there were many) either had a dog or a baby. This is one park where dogs are allowed to run off their leads. Considering how crowded it was with children, I could only imagine this happening in the States. There were a couple of pit bulls running loose but I wasn’t concerned. They don’t have the bad reputation here that they do back home. Everyone seemed to be happy, including the friendly dogs who came up for a pat.

Pakowhai Regional Park

I immediately went the opposite direction of everyone and headed for the trees while the sun was still out. Unbelievably beautiful, it was hard to take my eyes off of them. It made me think about Pollard Park in Blenheim. It wasn’t quite the caliber of that one, but it did have some typical New Zealand scenes.

Pakowhai Regional Park

Large, mature trees that are perfectly shaped and super green grass that contrasts with fallen leaves. A mix of evergreens and large clumps of flax with a stream or river running through it, is always clear and cold. It’s nature’s eye candy and just makes you feel good to take it all in.

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Leggy pine trees lost a few members, but I liked that they made use of the stumps. One tree had been uprooted from the recent heavy rains we had.

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pakowhai regional park

We walked back toward the parking lot and I was surprised to find a gathering of large cabbage trees. One had been cut down and the heart shaped trunk caught my eye.

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Some beautiful VERY white gum (eucalyptus) trees appeared around the bend, looking like the skin on an animal.

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On the way out to Hastings, an apple orchard caught my eye as we were coming off a bridge. It was high enough to see over them so I said we had to pull over before getting to the bridge so I could walk up there and take a picture. This is a big fruit town, so most of the orchards you see are a lot of these creepy, multiple armed apple trees. They look like they come alive at night and run around terrorizing the town.

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These seemed harmless enough and their yellow and orange leaves stretched as far as the eye could see. If you look close enough, you can make out some apples still clinging onto life. It’s not a sight I’m used to seeing, coming from wine country, but definitely worth capturing. Now, the citrus trees are ripening so we’ll have more oranges and mandarins than we can eat. I could think of worse problems to have.
fall apple orchard napier